Category Archives: insight

Scientia potentia est

“Knowledge is power”

Jerry Weinberg cites courage as the most important trait in a tester. Quoting Kipling, Jerry says testers need to “keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you.”

But I see a another type of courage at play in software testing. Testers are foremost learners. Through enquiry,they learn about a system. The information they gather facilitates many kinds of decision making from releasing to designing new features.

Observe great testers and you will discover an insatiable desire to learn more, not only about the product, but the world around us, often incorporating what they learn into their testing.

For many of us, discovering that our learning is within our control and within our means, can itself be a road of discovery. It takes courage to start that journey, but it also take courage to continue along its path.

Young Luke Skywalker found the ‘Force’ early on in life. Yoda helped him connect with that power, but even then, he needed guidance and a reminder to ‘Use the Force’ when up against the evil Empire.

Some of us need that reminder now and then. We know we have the ability to learn, and we know of its power, but we forget to use it. Especially when things get tough.

“Knowledge is power”

When things don’t go the way you want, when the pressures of daily life cloud your ambitions and goals, it can be easy to lose site of learning. Here’s what I’ve discovered though, through focusing on learning in these times you gain great strength.

Will the actual knowledge you learn help you succeed? Perhaps. What really counts is that through learning comes power in the form of ownership and self belief. You may not be able to control the situation at hand, but through being open to and owning your learning, you regain a sense of control and a sense of focus.

So when the dog bites, when the bee stings and when you’re feeling sad, remember there is solace in learning. It’s not only as an escape, or way of learning how to deal with the situation, but helps you take ownership and responsibility over the next step. Who knows, learning may be the just the ticket you need to recharge those batteries, giving you the juice to continue on your journey or perhaps, dump it for a different destination.

This post was first published on medium. Mauri Edo tweeted about it recently and I’ve decided to post it here too because I like it so much. 

Are you Serious?

Are you serious?

Seriously, how serious are you about testing? Lets presume you study the craft of testing. Does that make you a serious tester?

If you answer yes to this question, congratulations. You are on your way to becoming a serious tester. Now ask yourself this question:

“Do you take yourself seriously?”

If you want to be taken seriously about testing, you need to take yourself seriously. Note the difference here. Taking yourself seriously is much larger than being a serious tester.

Taking yourself seriously means you avoid behaviour and thinking such as:

“I will put myself down in front of others to make them feel better about themselves”
“I resort to behaving childishly when placed in pressure situations”
“I hand over power in order to avoid conflict”
“I feel like a fake even though my actions demonstrate otherwise”

I know this, because its only recently I realised that I haven’t been taking myself so seriously.

When you stop speaking to yourself in such a way and start taking yourself seriously, a wonderful thing happens. You start to believe in yourself. In fact, you have to. You owe it to yourself to do so.

I’ve discovered a new strength in this self belief. It means I have courage and strength to stand up for what I want. In doing so, I give myself the respect and honour for all the hard work I have put in.

So, let me ask the question again: Do you take yourself seriously?

Expression epitomised in Rage comics following a David Silverman interview of Fox News by Bill O’Reilly 

Question with sprinkle of humility on the side

Michael Bolton tweeted yesterday:

Why do testers insist on trying to be influential? I suspect part of the reason is that part of a tester’s job is to recognise problems. Too often , testers see that the *real* problem is not the software itself, but the process behind the software and go into bug prevention mode. That sort of change requires influence.

Often though, we simply don’t have the authority or the influence to do make change. We may moan and tear our hair out in frustration, but at the end of the day, without the mandate to make change and the influence to implement it, there’s little we can do to change an organisations culture or process.

Trying do do so regardless, can lead to a sense of helplessness and even slowly, over time, a sense of powerlessness. I suspect most of us at one time or another have felt like this. It’s not a great position to be in.

I know I’ve been there. I tried to change the culture of a company (company no less!) that had some  negative ideas about testing and teamwork in general. (I’m talking about this at Eurostar this year). As a consultant, I probably should have known better, but I argued (to myself) that the culture was affecting the tester’s ability to perform their job. It needed to change!

We  testers are gifted with keen observation skills and the nature of our role sometimes means we get to see and recognise problems that perhaps others don’t. But lets not get away with ourselves. Without a mandate for change, we become close to the schoolyard tale tattler, dobbing in on everyone and despised by all (including often the teacher). I failed to recognise that I hadn’t the authority or the influence to make these sorts of changes. I fell into a classic consultants trap. I really should have known better.

It’s not that we *should* or *should not* ignore these problems. Often these challenges are too complex to be solved with simple answers and probably need to be dealt with on a case by case basis. But I think adopting the tone of helper (or servant) goes a long way to contributing to an answer. In some cases a question sprinkled with a little humility can be more helpful than smothering the problem with large doses of  tester sauce.

I hope I’ll remember that next time!