“Nobody — calls me — chicken.”

One of the morals of the Back to The Future series is be able to walk away from a fight. It took three movies for Marty McFly to learn this self control.

Biff Tannen calling Marty “chicken” in 1955.

One thing that the scriptwriters failed to predict was the birth of speaking your mind in 140 characters, aka Twitter.  If they had, it would be easy to see how Marty might have been pulled in to a twitter diatribe and feel unable to resist  responding.

Screenshot 2014-10-14 07.47.54

 

It’s easy to engage on Twitter. It’s fun and easy to throw out ideas, thoughts and its mildly useful for debate. My personal experience though is that its much harder to disengage. I  feel compelled to reply to a challenge. It’s as if each tweet directed at me is a personal call to respond (sometimes it is). As much as I want to ignore and avoid, I find myself compelled to return and <sigh> to respond. My reasoning mind tells me, desist, desist, but my ego overrides this. I must have the final word!

There comes a point in any twitter engagement when you realise the conversation is little about debate and more about chest beating. When I’ve come to this realisation, I’ve lost the battle. I’m no longer in control regardless of having the last word or not. There’s little dignity in wining such a battle.

We need to learn the art of disengagement, the ability to walk away without feeling somehow less of a person. It’s important to engage, but its also important to be able to disengage.

I’ve come up with some heuristics to help me battle the McFly syndrome.

Yes, And Heuristic
I got this from Lynne Cazeallys book Create Change. Instead of think ‘yes but’, think ‘Yes and..’. .it goes some way to appearing collaborative, perhaps reducing the antagonism in the twitter conversation.

How about this? Heuristic
Another Lynne Cazeally suggestion. It uses a lot of characters but you can apply the sentiment to help sound more congenial.

Rule of Three Heuristic
Sometimes, attempting to understand other reasons why someone might write something helps you to walk away. Taken from Jerry Weinberg’s rule of three.

Out to Lunch Heuristic
I’ve seen people use this occasionally where they excuse the challenge to go out and walk the dog, feed the kids etc. I haven’t tried it myself but its a method of walking away with some grace. Even better if the reason is valid.

Blank Wall
Simply don’t respond. Oh to have the will power to apply this, especially in the heat of battle!

Blocking Heuristic.
A crude yet highly effective way of not knowing is someone is responding to you or not. You are now blissfully unaware. The downside is that you will never hear anything that this person has to say. You may consider this a good thing.

Turn off Twitter 
The ultimate solution and something a few people have resorted to. Not only does twitter seem to bring out the worst in people it’s incredibly time consuming. Ask yourself do you really need it?

What tactics do you use to help you disengage from a twitter war?

Take the ‘Crappy Work’ Litmus Test

We’ve placed a ban on crappy work within my test team. From now on, we declare that the testing team will refuse to do crappy work.

The challenge is in knowing how your doing good work or crappy work?  This is why I’ve created this simple 5 minute ‘Crappy Work’™ ² test to help any tester to figure out if you’re doing crappy work or not. ¹

1) Do I fully understand what I’ve been asked to do?

2) Why am I doing this task?

3) Who will benefit, and I have spoken to them ?

4) Am I doing this task simply because its part of the process?

5) If I think it’s crappy work, how can I make it valuable?

I’m sure there are plenty more ‘crappy work’  questions that would be useful to add, but my 5 minutes is up.

Why not share your ‘crappy work’ litmus tests? 

¹ Maverick Tester takes no responsibility if you take this quiz and continue to do crappy work

² It’s a 5 minute quiz because it took me 5 minutes to think it up. It’s trademarked so I can sell you a certificate in passing the ‘Crappy Work’ test, thereby making a whole lot of money out of it.

High Line by David Berkowitz

How will Continuous Delivery affect network traffic?

I was recently in New York and had a chance to walk along the High Line. The High Line is a disused overhead train line converted into a walkway and park. It’s a really lovely walk.

High Line by David Berkowitz
High Line by David Berkowitz

I was interested to learn that the train line had been built in the 1930’s but had become disused by 1980’s. It’s main purpose had been to transport meat and produce to manhattan from the upper west side. With the advent of trucks the train line fell into disuse. It was about to be torn down when a small group of inspired locals advocated it be turned into a park. The movement grew and now the disused train line is a lovely walk and respite from the busy traffic.

I think it’s interesting that the train line fell into disuse in the first place. Why were so many companies eager to drop the train line in place of trucks? My guess is they wanted the ability to freight cargo when they wanted. Rather then delivering in one bulk they delivered smaller amounts more frequently. That way they could become more responsive to their customers needs.

That’s what we’re aiming to do with continuous delivery. We want to   be able to deliver in a faster way, to be more responsive to our customers needs.

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World Class Traffic Jam by bk

I wonder if our existing network will be able to handle it though? Look at the traffic jam that is NYC and it makes me wonder that with the ability over faster and more frequent delivery comes the cost of greater traffic on our networks. Remember, if it was just your company wanting to deliver, of course there’s sufficient bandwidth, but when everyone has the same idea will our current network be able to handle it? I  guess only time will tell!

 

independently Minded